Findhorn Bay fishing boat graveyard

Findhorn Bay fishing boat graveyard

Survey and historical research Local residents Michael Sharpe and Tim Negus first brought this unrecorded site to our attention. Working with Findhorn Village Heritage and the Nautical Archaeology Society, we had a fabulous weekend in July 2015 with 20 volunteers...
Picts and the Wemyss Caves

Picts and the Wemyss Caves

The nation of the Picts, the Roman-named ‘painted ones’, or possibly the Latin form of a forgotten native name, emerged from the tribal societies of late Iron Age Scotland through resistance to Roman control. Between the 6th and 9th centuries AD, their territories...
Exploring the Clyde with Britain at Low Tide

Exploring the Clyde with Britain at Low Tide

This week, Channel 4’s Britain at Low Tide comes to Scotland to explore the archaeology of the Clyde…here we give you a bit more about one of the stories that will feature. Glaswegians in the 18th century had a problem – its trading ships landed at Port Glasgow,...
Britain at Low Tide – Behind the Scenes

Britain at Low Tide – Behind the Scenes

The second series of Britain at Low Tide (Channel 4) features two episodes filmed in Scotland, and the programme is a great opportunity to show off some of our stunning Scottish coastal archaeology. But how do programmes like this get made? The first episode features...
Findhorn Bay Zulus

Findhorn Bay Zulus

Scattered along the Culbin edge of Findhorn Bay lie the remains of at least 35 large wooden fishing boats. These are extremely rare survivals of the once common mighty Zulu herring drifter. Today only a single Class 1 Zulu survives in the Scottish Fisheries Museum in...

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