Condition

6
wooden posts
Modern
113054
Edinburgh

Description

Located on Crammond beach immediately west of point where river Almond flows into Forth. A series of wooden posts placed at intervals of c 20 by 25m, running east/west along shore. The posts are visible for c 0.15-0.20m out of the sand and are in a very rotted condition. They are probably 2WW anti-glider defenses. Edit March 2014: A series of upright wooden posts placed on the tidal flats west of the River Almond estuary at Cramond. They are recorded by the Defence of Britain Project as being part of a series of Second World War anti-glider defences, presumably since the area would otherwise be an easily locatable stretch of broad unobstructed ground at low tide. Posts were observed to continue westwards along the coastline for over 1.5km towards Barnbougle Castle, and are purported to stretch as far as Hound Point. The posts are spaced semi-regularly, normally between c.10m and 30m apart. They are positioned between c.10m and c.150m from the current HWM, with the majority concentrated at less than c.100m. The posts themselves are very irregular, and are generally between c.0.10m and 0.30m in diameter, standing vertically between c.0.10m and 1.0m from the sand. Their condition is poor and rotten, and most of those observed show evidence of their tops having been broken off.

Location

318835.00
677211.00
27700
55.9809875
-3.3023353

Submitted photographs

Image Date Caption User
Posts continuing west towards Barnbugle Castle by Laurens McGregor 12/03/2014 Posts continuing west towards Barnbugle Castle by Laurens McGregor EllieSCHARP
Posts continuing west towards Barnbugle Castle by Laurens McGregor
View of coast from eastern edge of site by Laurens McGregor 12/03/2014 View of coast from eastern edge of site by Laurens McGregor EllieSCHARP
View of coast from eastern edge of site by Laurens McGregor
Post nearest Cramond village by Laurens McGregor 12/03/2014 Post nearest Cramond village by Laurens McGregor EllieSCHARP
Post nearest Cramond village by Laurens McGregor
Overview of site from Eagle Rock by Laurens McGregor 12/03/2014 Overview of site from Eagle Rock by Laurens McGregor EllieSCHARP
Overview of site from Eagle Rock by Laurens McGregor

Submitted updates

Update id Date User
1587 10/03/2014 Laurens
Tidal state Low
Site located? Yes
Proximity to coast edge Intertidal
Coastally eroding? active sea erosion; has eroded in the past; accreting
Threats none
Visibility above ground Limited visibility (partial remains)
Visibility in section Not visible
Access accessible - difficult terrain; accessible on foot (footpath)
Local knowledge don't know
Description Located on Crammond beach immediately west of point where river Almond flows into Forth. A series of wooden posts placed at intervals of c 20 by 25m, running east/west along shore. The posts are visible for c 0.15-0.20m out of the sand and are in a very rotted condition. They are probably 2WW anti-glider defenses. [Edit:] A series of upright wooden posts placed on the tidal flats west of the River Almond estuary at Cramond. They are recorded by the Defence of Britain Project as being part of a series of Second World War anti-glider defences, presumably since the area would otherwise be an easily locatable stretch of broad unobstructed ground at low tide. Posts were observed to continue westwards along the coastline for over 1.5km towards Barnbougle Castle, and are purported to stretch as far as Hound Point. The posts are spaced semi-regularly, normally between c.10m and 30m apart. They are positioned between c.10m and c.150m from the current HWM, with the majority concentrated at less than c.100m. The posts themselves are very irregular, and are generally between c.0.10m and 0.30m in diameter, standing vertically between c.0.10m and 1.0m from the sand. Their condition is poor and rotten, and most of those observed show evidence of their tops having been broken off.
The site is in poor condition, but further recording of the physical remains is unlikely to be particularly enlightening, except to verify whether the posts do extend all the way to Hound Point. Useful insight is more likely to be gained from researching documentary records and period aerial photography.
Comments [Note: I have revised the site position to roughly mark the eastern end of the posts on the west side of the River Almond, although the site itself does continue far to the west.] The site stretches along tidal flats accessible at low tide, which are easily reached at several points along the well-used shore path between Queensferry and Cramond (now part of the John Muir Way). In the area surveyed (between the River Almond and Eagle Rock), the posts are mostly in muddy sand which was not deep, but fairly sticky, and likely difficult enough to deter visitors. Although surveyed at low tide, all observed posts showed signs of being covered fully by the sea at high tide, such as barnacle colonies and seaweeds on top. They are subject to erosion, with all posts showing signs of gradual seawater wear. It was apparent that most had also had their tops broken off at some point, and the varying smoothness of the splintered ends would imply these were individual events at different times. The posts towards the eastern edge near Cramond were notably shorter than those further west; I can only speculate as to the cause. They may have been shortened to avoid damaging the boats of the adjacent harbour. Those on the eastern side closest to the river Almond were covered in silty deposits to varying degrees, suggesting accretion at this end. No evidence was seen of any concrete bases for the posts, as apparently was the case for some of the posts on the eastern side of Cramond(not surveyed). Original 1996 CZAS supposition that these are WWII anti-glider defences appears accurate. The Defence of Britain project database describes these as part of a string of anti-glider obstacles stretching from Hound Point to Muirhouse, constructed between 1940 and 1941 as part of Edinburgh's outer defence line (the Black Line), possibly under the auspices of the Edinburgh Home Guard. [See http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archives/view/dob/ai_full_r.cfm?refno=13857&CFID=28072&CFTOKEN=449B3529-40D7-425B-A3747EB2E92B516E]

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